Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points. In the sleepy morning or busywork, will you enjoy a cup of fragrant and mellow coffee? Nowadays, coffee has become a necessity in many people’s lives.

In recent years, scientists have conducted much research to reveal the relationship between coffee and human diseases. The following editor will look at the various relationships between coffee and body diseases.

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a compound commonly found in coffee can help prevent specific damaging effects of obesity.

Related research published in the journal Pharmaceutical Research found that chlorogenic acid (CGA) significantly reduced liver insulin resistance and fat accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

Previous studies have shown that drinking coffee can reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The new research extends the benefits of this specific compound, CGA, found in large quantities in coffee and found in other fruits and vegetables such as apples, pears, tomatoes, and blueberries.

In the past 20 years, the number of obese people in the United States has increased significantly. Over one-third of American adults and approximately 17% of children are obese. Besides weight gain, two common side effects of obesity are increased insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver. If left untreated, these diseases can lead to diabetes and liver damage.

[2] Hepatology: decaffeinated coffee is good for the body

Recently, in a research report published in the international journal Hepatology, researchers from the National Cancer Institute reported that drinking decaffeinated coffee may be beneficial to the liver’s health. The researchers said that regardless of the caffeine content, high-dose coffee intake is directly related to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes, indicating that other non-caffeine compounds in coffee may help protect the body’s liver health.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

According to data from the American Coffee Association in 2010, coffee drinking is highly popular among more than half of the American population over the age of 18. These people drink at least three cups of coffee a day. Coffee consumption has increased by 1% every year since the 1980s. In the past few years, it will increase by 2% every year; previous studies have found that coffee intake can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes and other diseases.

Researcher Qian Xiao said that previous studies have found that coffee may have a particularly protective effect on the liver. However, if this protective effect is not enough to extend to decaffeinated coffee, then the evidence seems insufficient and clear; the study in this study. The staff surveyed 27,793 individuals aged 20 and over. The researchers asked these participants to drink coffee within 24 hours. They then measured the levels of several enzymes related to liver function in the blood of these individuals, including alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. , Alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl aminotransferase to determine the operation of the individual’s liver.

In the sleepy morning or busywork, will you enjoy a cup of fragrant and mellow coffee? Nowadays, coffee has basically become a necessity in many people’s lives.

In recent years, scientists have conducted much research to reveal the relationship between coffee and human diseases. The following editor will take a look at the various relationships between coffee and body diseases.

Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points
Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

[1] Pharm Res: Coffee is beneficial and can prevent obesity-related diseases

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a compound commonly found in coffee can help prevent specific damaging effects of obesity.

Related research published in the journal Pharmaceutical Research found that chlorogenic acid (CGA) significantly reduced liver insulin resistance and fat accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

Previous studies have shown that drinking coffee can reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The new research extends the benefits of this specific compound, CGA, found in large quantities in coffee and found in other fruits and vegetables such as apples, pears, tomatoes, and blueberries.

In the past 20 years, the number of obese people in the United States has increased significantly. More than one-third of American adults and approximately 17% of children are obese. In addition to weight gain, two common side effects of obesity are increased insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver. If left untreated, these diseases can lead to diabetes and liver damage.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)
Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points
Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

[2] Hepatology: decaffeinated coffee is good for the body

Recently, in a research report published in the international journal Hepatology, researchers from the National Cancer Institute reported that drinking decaffeinated coffee may be beneficial to the liver’s health. The researchers said that regardless of the caffeine content, however, high-dose coffee intake is directly related to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes, which shows that other non-caffeine compounds in coffee may help protect the body’s liver health.

According to data from the American Coffee Association in 2010, coffee drinking is highly popular among more than half of the American population over the age of 18. These people drink at least three cups of coffee a day. Coffee consumption has increased by 1% every year since the 1980s. In the past few years, it will increase by 2% every year; previous studies have found that coffee intake can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes and other diseases.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

Researcher Qian Xiao said that previous studies have found that coffee may have a protective effect on the liver. However, if this protective effect is not enough to extend to decaffeinated coffee, then the evidence seems insufficient and clear; the study in this study. The staff conducted a study on 27,793 individuals aged 20 and over. The researchers asked these participants to drink coffee within 24 hours. They then measured the levels of several enzymes related to liver function in the blood of these individuals, including alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. , Alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl aminotransferase to determine the function of the individual’s liver.

Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points
Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points

A recent study found that a new large-scale study has identified six new genetic variants related to habitual coffee consumption. Researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital helped explain why a predetermined amount of coffee or caffeine has different effects on different people through genome-wide analysis and explores the link between coffee and health in the future. Related research provides relevant content genetically.

“Coffee and caffeine have a certain relationship with health promotion or health damage. Our findings may identify a small group of people who pursue health and are most likely to benefit from more or less coffee drinking.” Marilyn Cornelis said she is a research assistant in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Genetics has always suspected that the cause of individual differences is because of coffee and caffeine. However, the precise location of specific gene variants is still a challenging subject.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

[4] Drinking coffee helps men’s gum health

Coffee contains antioxidants. Antioxidants can fight gum disease. So does coffee also help fight gum disease?

Recently, researchers at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine found that drinking coffee does not hurt periodontal health. It may have a protective effect on periodontal diseases. The research conclusions were published in the Journal of Periodontology.

Coffee drinking is associated with a decrease in the amount of periodontal bone loss. Researchers have concluded that drinking coffee may prevent periodontal bone loss in adult men.

This is the first long-term study investigating the relationship between coffee consumption and human periodontal disease. Researchers observed data on 1,152 people who attended the US Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study (DLS) between 1968 and 1998.

[5] Does caffeine advance energy or boost energy?

When the body needs to rest, the adenosine/Аденозин in the brain will adhere to the adenosine receptors of nerve cells. This effect will weaken the activity of the nerve cells-causing drowsiness.

Caffeine is an inhibitor of adenosine receptors in the brain. Simply put, caffeine is similar in structure to adenosine. They can bind to adenosine receptor A1, but it’s like chewing gum sticking to a keyhole. The combination of glycoside receptor and caffeine will not produce the effect it should have-the activity of nerve cells will not be weakened. As a result, when it is time to sleep, people will not feel drowsy because of caffeine intake.

In addition, caffeine not only binds to adenosine A1 receptors but also adenosine A2 receptors. Studies have shown that activation of adenosine A2 receptors in the central nervous system inhibits dopamine D2 receptors. Inhibition of adenosine A2 receptors maintains the activity of dopamine D2 receptors to a certain extent-this allows caffeine to promote the effects of some stimulant drugs.

Caffeine can also stabilize the functional activity of cholinergic receptors in the cerebral cortex, which is also related to mental excitement.

[6] Drinking coffee may worsen hot flashes and night sweats in menopausal women

After going through Menopause, about two-thirds of women will be affected by hot flashes and night sweats, and new survey data shows that drinking coffee may worsen these hot flashes and night sweats.

Researcher Dr Stephanie Faubion said: Although these results are preliminary, our research shows that limiting coffee intake is effective for women who suffer from hot flashes and night sweats after Menopause.

Caffeine is a stimulant found in coffee and cola, but caffeine has a different effect on women who transition to Menopause (i.e., Menopause). During the transition period, caffeine may improve their mood, memory and concentration.

The results of the study were published in the journal Menopause. The results are derived from a survey of over 1,800 menopausal women in 2005 and 2011, comparing symptoms between coffee users and non-users.

Treating menopausal symptoms is challenging, but there are many strategies to improve control; Faubion said: One way to control troublesome symptoms is to be careful about what you eat. This usually means giving up stimulating foods and hot drinks and caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco.

[7] It may not be credible that × cups of coffee a day reduces or increases the risk of disease Y

In health-related headlines, it often appears that caffeinated coffee is a “curse” of disease or can cure all diseases. For example, × cups of coffee a day can reduce or increase your risk of disease Y. But a new study on the caffeine and caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) of various European coffees once again put forward what, chemically , just “a cup of coffee” means.

In this non-funded research project, or “curiosity-driven research,” Alan Crozier from the University of Glasgow in the UK described the team measured the caffeine-CQA ratio of over 100 espresso coffees. The results show that the percentage of caffeine to CQA varies from 0.7 to 11 in espresso, depending on the preparation conditions. Therefore, a cup of coffee is a variable research unit. Studies have pointed out that it may be complicated to evaluate the health benefits of using coffee. It is not advisable to conduct epidemiological studies on this.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

[8] PLoS ONE: Research reveals how coffee prevents Parkinson’s disease

Recently, researchers from Linköping University in Sweden discovered a specific genetic variant that contains Parkinson’s disease, especially for those who drink a lot of coffee.

The research was published in the scientific journal PLOS One. Genetic and environmental factors interact with each other to lead to the emergence of diseases, so research often focuses on identifying the effects of genetic and environmental exposure to the increased risk of infections. But the study points out that there are also genetic variations-mutations and certain environmental factors that can prevent certain diseases from appearing.

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease have a complex background in which genetic factors and environmental exposure factors are involved. Recently, a study determined that a mutation in the glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A can be used as a protective factor for Parkinson’s disease. The corresponding protein of the GRIN2A gene is believed to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

[9] PLoS ONE: The interaction of caffeine and specific genes can protect the body against Parkinson’s disease

Recently, in a research paper published in the international journal Plus One, researchers from Linkoping University in Sweden found that a unique genetic mutation may protect individuals against Parkinson’s disease, especially those who drink a lot of coffee. , It is less prone to Parkinson’s disease.

During the emergence of diseases, genetic factors and environmental factors will interact, and current researchers focus on identifying genes that increase the risk of infectious diseases. Still, there are often specific genetic mutations and environmental factors, both of which can be Protect the body against the occurrence of certain conditions.

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease have very complex pathogenesis, involving individual genetic factors and external environmental factors during its pathogenesis; in this study, researchers studied millions of patients with congenital abnormalities and found a name It is a mutant of the GRIN2A gene, which may be a protective factor that protects the body against Parkinson’s disease. The protein expressed by this gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases.

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

[10] Beauty research found new effects of coffee: it can help treat glaucoma

According to an expert from Cornell University in New York, coffee itself contains antioxidants and can treat retinal detachment in patients with glaucoma.

According to a study by experts from Cornell University in the United States, the antioxidant function in the coffee itself can effectively treat glaucoma. The potent antioxidant in it is called chlorogenic acid, a synthetic caffeic acid ester with a content of 7% to 9% in coffee. The caffeine content in coffee is only 1%. with weakened vision and degeneration of the retina, chlorogenic acid can play a role in repairing and preventing further deterioration of symptoms. In addition, chlorogenic acid can also delay ageing and help treat diabetes because of its antioxidant properties.

The director of the research project said: “The retina is a metabolically active tissue, so it needs a lot of oxygen, which is related to the so-called oxidative stress. Insufficient oxygen and the production of free radicals can cause tissue damage and eventually blindness. “

(Is coffee good or bad for your health? 20 points)

[11] JAFC: A cup of coffee a day may inhibit individual retinal damage

Recently, in a research paper published in the international journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers from South Korea have shown through research that drinking a cup of coffee a day may inhibit the deterioration of vision and damage to the retina.

Green coffee contains an average of 1% caffeine, which includes 7% to 9% of chlorogenic acid (CLA). Chlorogenic acid is a potent antioxidant that can inhibit retinal degeneration in the mouse body; the retina is many photoreceptor cells the thinner tissue layer in other nerve cells (receiving visual information), and, it is also a tissue with a relatively vigorous metabolism. It needs a higher level of oxygen to stimulate it to produce oxidative stress. Oxygen deficiency and the production of free radicals can trigger retina Tissue damage and individual blindness.

In this study, the researchers used nitric oxide to treat mice, which can stimulate the mice’s body to produce oxidative stress and free radicals, leading to retinal degeneration, but the mice pre-treated with chlorogenic acid did not develop retinas. Transsexual. Researcher Chang Y. Lee said that natural products might have health effects on the body. In previous studies, we found that coffee can reduce the risk of individuals with certain chronic diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and prostate cancer.

[12] deontology: Coffee reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and adds new evidence

According to a new study by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), people who drink more than one cup of coffee a day for more than four years have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who have no changes in coffee consumption11 %. In addition, the study found that those who consumed less coffee each day had a 17% increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Researcher Shilpa Bhupathiraju said: “Our findings confirm the results of previous studies, showing that higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Most importantly, they provide new evidence that changing coffee consumption habits will affect the risk of type 2 diabetes in a relatively short period of time.

The research was published in the April 24th issue of Diabetologia. Researchers analyzed 48,464 women in Brigham and Women’s Hospital-based Nurses’ Health Study (1986-2006), 47,510 women in Nurses’ Health Study II (1991-2007), and Health Professionals Follow-up Study ( 1986-2006) the consumption of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee and caffeinated tea among 27,759 men. A questionnaire survey will be conducted on the diet of the participants every four years. If any participant reports type 2 diabetes, the patient will fill out an additional questionnaire. A total of 7,269 cases of type 2 diabetes have been well documented.

[13] Clon Gastroenterology H: Drinking coffee regularly can reduce the risk of liver cancer

Recently, researchers said that they had discovered another reason why people love coffee. A new study shows that people who drink at least one cup a day have a relatively lower risk of liver cancer compared to people who drink coffee only occasionally.

This research began in the 1990s. Researchers collected coffee drinking habits and other lifestyle habits of nearly 180,000 adults of different races and ethnic backgrounds. The study participants have now been followed for up to 18 years. So far, 498 study participants have been diagnosed with liver cancer.

Compared with those who drank six or fewer cups per week, those who drank 1 to 3 cups of coffee a day had a 29% reduction in liver cancer risk. People who often exceed four cups of coffee a day have a 42% lower risk. More importantly, the researchers eliminated factors known to increase the wind direction of liver cancer, such as age, obesity, smoking, drinking, gender, and diabetes.

[14] Diabetes Care: High-dose coffee intake may effectively reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

Recently, in a research paper published in the international journal Diabetes Care, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health have shown through research that high-dose coffee intake is directly related to low-risk type 2 diabetes.

In the article, the researcher Ming Ding and his research team conducted a systematic and comprehensive analysis of 28 prospective studies and nested case-control studies in an effort to assess the relationship between individual coffee intake and their risk of type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that compared with individuals who did not consume coffee or low-level intake, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes for individuals who drink a cup of coffee a day is 0.92 (95% confidence interval) and that individuals who drink 2 cups of coffee a day suffer from type 2 diabetes The risk of diabetes is 0.85, the risk of type 2 diabetes is 0.79 for drinking 3 cups of coffee a day, and the risk of drinking 4 cups a day is 0.75, and the risk of drinking 5 cups a day for diabetes is 0.71. Individuals who drink 6 cups of coffee a day have 2. The risk of type diabetes is 0.67.

[15] Nat Neurosci.: Drink coffee every day to improve memory

Johns Hopkins University psychologists and neurobiologists claim that 200 mg of caffeine a day in adults will improve the brain’s “pattern recognition” ability.

Pattern recognition refers to the ability to distinguish two similar but not identical events or experiences. This ability can effectively evaluate the accuracy of memory retrieval.

The ability of the brain to recognize patterns will prevent our memory from becoming a mess, play an important role in the learning process, and help us distinguish whether some information has been forgotten or give some information new meaning.

Scientists recruited more than 150 subjects who did not drink coffee regularly. Before administering caffeine to the subjects, the scientists showed the subjects pictures of common objects, such as rubber ducks or office chairs. Then the subjects were randomly divided into two groups, one group took a placebo, and the other group took 200 mg caffeine tablets.

[16] Hepatology: moderate intake of caffeine may prevent fatty liver

Coffee or tea contains caffeine, and many people know that it can relieve fatigue and drive away drowsiness. The latest research shows that moderate caffeine intake may also reduce the risk of a common type of fatty liver.

The research was conducted by institutions such as the Duke University School of Medicine. Through cell culture experiments and animal experiments on mice fed a high-fat diet, the researchers found that the caffeine contained in coffee and tea can stimulate the metabolism of lipids accumulated in liver cells and effectively reduce the degree of fatty liver in mice…

The final results show that if the human body consumes about four cups of coffee or tea a day, the caffeine contained in it may be beneficial to the prevention and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD).

[17] PLoS ONE: Drinking coffee every day can improve liver function

According to the Chinese website of “Nihon Keizai Shimbun”, the research team of Osaka City University in Japan recently announced the results of a study, saying that patients with chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis or cirrhosis should drink more than one cup of drip a day. With coffee (drip coffee), the function of the liver will be improved.

The research team used 376 patients in their 20s to 80s who were treated at Osaka City University Hospital to observe and analyze the relationship between the changes in the value of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in their bodies and the frequency of coffee drinking. Hepatocyte damage generally leads to an increase in the value of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in the body.

It was found that people who drank more than one cup of drip coffee a day had more people whose ALT index remained at a normal value or declined after a year than those who did not drink it. People who drink canned coffee, instant coffee, and decaffeinated coffee have little effect.

[18] PLOS Genetics: Coffee or beer may affect telomere length

Recently, Professor Martin Kupiec and his team discovered that coffee and beer might also have the opposite effect on your genome (telomere length). Using a kind of yeast (which shares many important genetic characteristics with humans), researchers found that caffeine shortens telomere length, while alcohol lengthens telomere length. Telomeres are the endpoint of chromosomal DNA and are closely related to ageing and cancer.

Professor Kupiec said: This is the first time that we have identified several environmental factors that change the length of telomeres. We have demonstrated how these environments do this, which may one day help the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Related research papers are published in the journal PLOS Genetics.

Telomeres are the ends of the DNA strands in chromosomes. They are essential to ensure that the DNA strands are repaired and replicated correctly. Whenever a cell replicates, the chromosomes are copied into a new cell with slightly shorter telomeres. Eventually, telomeres will become too short, and the cell will die. Only the fetus and cancer cells have a mechanism to avoid this fate, and they will continue to replicate.

Researchers extend the research of Nobel Prize winner and molecular biologist Professor Elizabeth Blackburn. Elizabeth Blackburn’s research shows that emotional stress leads to the shortening of telomeres by generating free radicals. In the new study, the researchers cultured yeast cells in the presence of free radicals to test their effect on telomere length. They were surprised to find that the length has not changed.

[19] Drinking three cups of coffee a day reduces the risk of liver cancer by half

The latest research shows that drinking three cups of coffee a day can prevent diabetes and reduce the chance of liver cancer by 50%.

According to a report from the British Daily Mail on Thursday, studies have shown that drinking coffee can reduce the risk of primary hepatocellular carcinoma by 40%. The latest study proved that the risk of the disease could be reduced by 50% by drinking coffee.

Researcher Carlo La Vecchia said that people always say that drinking coffee is good for health, especially the health of the liver. Now, this statement has been scientifically certified.

Vecchia, professor of clinical science and community health at the University of Milan, explained that the reason why drinking coffee can reduce the risk of liver cancer is that coffee can help people avoid diabetes, which is one of the important factors that cause liver cancer.

The researchers integrated all relevant data from 1996 to September 2012 and conducted a meta-analysis, which included 16 high-quality research reports and 3153 cases. The study also included more than 900 cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma since 2007.

[20] Drinking over 4 cups of coffee a day increases the risk of death

Drinking over 28 cups of coffee a week or over 4 cups a day will significantly increase the risk of death for both men and women under 55.

People who often drink coffee, please pay attention. A recent study in the United States found that drinking over 28 cups of coffee a week or over 4 cups a day will significantly increase the risk of death for both men and women under 55.

The University of South Carolina in the United States reported in the new issue of the Mayo Clinic Journal that they analyzed more than 40,000 respondents who participated in the lifestyle survey between 1971 and 2002 and found that men under the age of 55 Drinking 28 cups of coffee will increase their risk of death by 56%, while the risk of death for women under 55 doubles. However, the study did not find that drinking too much coffee has an adverse effect on people over 55 years of age.

A cup of coffee defined by this study is 6 to 8 ounces (approximately 180 to 240 millilitres). Study co-author Sui Xuemei, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, reminded: “People who drink a lot of coffee should be careful, because this large-scale study shows that this is at least related to an increased risk of death in general, especially those younger than 55 years of age should be vigilant.”

Looking at the progress of these studies, it is not difficult to find that coffee does have certain benefits to the health of the body, and it can also prevent the occurrence of some diseases. However, coffee also has certain health risks. Of course, I believe that scientists will continue to do more in-depth research. Research to clarify the effects of coffee on the human body.

13 good reasons to drink more coffee

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